Repower Pennsylvania

Coal, gas and nuclear — we can do better

The ways that we produce and use energy in Pennsylvania have a severe impact on our environment and health. PennEnvironment is working toward a new energy future that promotes clean, renewable energy and uses efficient technologies to help protect the planet.

Pennsylvania could be doing a lot better when it comes to the ways we use and produce our energy. Dirty, coal-fired power plants pollute our air with smog and soot, and our rivers and streams with mercury. Marcellus Shale gas drilling contaminates our streams and destroys our pristine forests. Nuclear power plants produce toxic waste, and pose the unlikely but catastrophic threat of a Fukushima-style disaster.

Powerful polluters push for the dirty energy status quo

Unfortunately, many electricity companies, coal companies and other polluters want to continue our reliance on dirty energy sources. These powerful interests are putting short-term profits ahead of our environment and health — and they have unfettered access and influence in the halls of the state capitol in Harrisburg and in Washington, D.C. Electric utilities spent more than $105 million on lobbying in 2011 alone.  Now they're pushing to cut Pennsylvania's critical Advanced Energy Portfolio Standard, which supports clean energy sollutions like wind and solar.  

Solar and wind offer path to a new energy future

At PennEnvironment, we have a different vision. We can get our energy from clean, renewable homegrown sources like wind and solar, while creating thousands of much-needed jobs in the state. We can achieve a new energy future where our homes and buildings create more clean energy than they need, where public transportation systems thrive and reduce our reliance on oil, and where technology allows our cars to get more than 100 miles to the gallon.

Pennsylvania has the technological know-how and renewable energy potential to clean up and modernize the way we produce energy. Clean, renewable energy sources are in abundance in Pennsylvania — especially wind and solar power — and they can help the Commonwealth decrease its reliance on dirtier, polluting forms of energy.


Clean Energy Updates

Report | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Destination: Zero Carbon

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News Release | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Statement: PennEnvironment criticizes President Trump’s visit to pro-fracking Shale Insight conference

PITTSBURGH -- President Donald Trump spoke today in support of fracking and petrochemicals at the Shale Insight conference, a two-day event featuring regional fracking industry associations. This comes after a visit on Aug. 13, 2019 to the massive Royal Dutch Shell petrochemical plant being built in Pittsburgh’s northern suburbs, which will convert fracked gas into plastic.

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News Release | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Statement: Trump administration rollback of California clean cars standards also hurts Pennsylvania

[Philadelphia, PA] -- The Trump Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing a plan today to strip away California’s authority to implement stronger car pollution safeguards than the federal government. This proposal comes at a time when two in three Americans say the United States needs to do more on climate change and several leading automakers already have agreed to follow California’s tougher emissions standards. Moreover, Pennsylvania is one of 13 states who have opted-in to these stricter standards.

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News Release | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

PA given “F” Grade for spending Volkswagen settlement money

[Harrisburg, PA] -- With “National Drive Electric Week” kicking off across the country, two non-profit organizations released new information grading Pennsylvania officials for the state’s track record allocating its portion of the Volkswagen settlement funds.

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Report | PennEnvironment Research & Policy Center

Volkswagen Settlement State Scorecard

It has been about three years since Volkswagen settled with federal authorities for cheating emissions laws in hundreds of thousands of vehicles advertised as “clean diesel.”[1] The settlement included billions of dollars to buy back the offending vehicles from consumers, as well as nearly $3 billion for the Environmental Mitigation Trust, to be distributed to every state and territory where offending vehicles were sold.[2] The Environmental Mitigation Trust funds are designed to be used for transportation projects that reduce pollution in an effort to mitigate the harm done by Volkswagen t

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